Ellen’s 12 years Performance Rates Weah’s Six Months in Office -National Orator

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    Finance and Development Planning Minister has provided a caustic response to opposition criticism that the ruling Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC) has had a poor showing in its first six months in office.

    Delivering this year’s 171 Independence Day Oration Thursday in Monrovia, Mr. Samuel D. Tweah, Jr. said rising inflation and currency depreciation being experienced can be traced to successive administrations failure to breakaway from the ‘vicious macroeconomic cycle’ that involves dependence on sales of raw materials (iron ore, rubber) that disregarded the idea of economic diversification.

    Homegrown factories, mass production of rice and other commodities and investment in domestic industries are sustainable way of pursing genuine economic growth and development, he said.

    Challenges facing Liberia and economies in Africa had existed for decades therefore it is nationally destructive for the opposition to politicize the unfolding state of the country’s economy as if it is the making of the Weah’s Administration, Tweah noted.

    According to the Orator, Weah was elected because Liberians believe he stands the greatest chance to change what has challenged the country for generations. The government remains committed to stabilizing the present macroeconomic situation, he reassured.

    The Orator: A six month old government cannot clearly be expected to solve the problems most African governments have not been able to solve in 60 years. And to believe that Liberians as smart as they are can be misled into thinking that the six months old government should solve the 60 year-old problem in six months is to think too low about Liberians.

    “The governing party is only as good as the conditions it inherits from the former ruling party. The CDC is as good as the conditions it inherited from the United Party in the first six months.

    The Finance Minister said the country has not been able to give social and economic justice to majority of its people since the founding of the nation-state and that the task now rest on the shoulders of the Weah administration

    Decades of state failure has made many Liberians to look at the past with disdain and while such feeling of failure, anger and rejection are quite justified, Liberians should be inspired by the ambition and bravery of the country’s founding fathers.

    “The failure of history is not defined by the number of tragedies that happened. The failure of our history occurs when our past cannot inspire new energy, new ambition, new construct to institutions that prevent the calamity of our history from reoccurring;” he said.

    “Our history failed not because Americo-Liberians suppressed their ethnic brothers and sisters for more than century. Our history failed because even after decades of the TWP mass of Liberians still feel marginalized in their country.”

    – Festus Poquie