NEC Results will stand… Senate Approves

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    The legislature and the President amended the country’s concession laws in the year (2010) the bribery occurred

    Plenary session of the senate Thursday passed a bill to clarify the power and authority of the National Elections Commission with respect to the qualification of political parties, organizations and independent candidates for ensuing elections.
    The bill, pending the House’s action will amend chapter 2 sections 2.9(g), (n) and (t), chapter 4, section 4.4 and 4.5, chapter 6, section 6.9 and chapter 9, section 9.1 of the elections law.
    The bill confirms and re-affirms provisions of the constitution and the elections law that the National Elections Commission is the sole determinant of the qualification of political parties and political organizations and independent candidates.
    The bill provides that the sole determinant of election results and disputes, except that the right of appeal is served to an interested party aggrieved by a decision of the NEC to appeal to the supreme court for review.
    The draft bill provides a five days period to file complaint with NEC to make a decision on the qualification of political parties, organizations and independent candidates’ elections results and disputes.
    A 15-day period is provided by the bill for NEC to review its decision after a petition has been filed with it (NEC) and a 30 days specific time as of the filling of an appeal within which the Supreme Court on all appeals shall make a decision.
    The draft law provides that appeals to the Supreme Court shall not serve as stay or supersedes decision of the NEC but that the decisions of NEC shall be enforceable and enforced pending the results of appeals there from to the Supreme Court.
    However, the bill is acted upon by the House, will titled “an act to amend certain provisions of the elections law to clarify the power and authority of the national elections commission with respect to the qualification of political parties and organizations for elections, determination of election results and determination of election disputes.
    Writes Titus E. Dessie